Heart Warming Doctor’s Note

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced new guidelines for those who have been fully vaccinated for COVID-19.

We know that people want to get vaccinated so they can get back to doing the things they enjoy with the people they love,” said CDC Director Rochelle P. Walensky, MD, MPH. “There are some activities that fully vaccinated people can begin to resume now in their own homes. Everyone – even those who are vaccinated – should continue with all mitigation strategies when in public settings.

  • Visit with other fully vaccinated people indoors without wearing masks or staying 6 feet apart.
  • Visit with unvaccinated people from one other household indoors without wearing masks or staying 6 feet apart if everyone in the other household is at low risk for severe disease.
  • Refrain from quarantine and testing if they do not have symptoms of COVID-19 after contact with someone who has COVID-19.

A person is considered fully vaccinated two weeks after receiving the last required dose of vaccine.

Evelyn Shaw, a grandmother in New York was given a special prescription after getting her second dose of the COVID-19 vaccine.

The doctor wrote a prescription that read, “You are allowed to hug your granddaughter.” It was then sealed in an envelope.

According to a Twitter post by Evelyn’s daughter Jessica, it was the “First hug she’s had in a year.” The post also read “Thank you to all the scientists and doctors who made this happen!”

Jessica Shaw’s sister, Dr. Laura Shaw Frank said, “Our mom’s doctor knows that our mom is very nervous to return to the world. She figured out how to ease her path. Medical care from the heart.”

CDC recommends that fully vaccinated people continue to take COVID-19 precautions when in public, when visiting with unvaccinated people from multiple other households, and when around unvaccinated people who are at high risk of getting severely ill from COVID-19.

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